AN EVALUATION OF A DERMATOLOGY VIGNETTE WEBSITE: WHAT USERS THOUGHT.

Author

Rod Tucker*, Mahendra Patel**, Alison M Layton†, Shernaz Walton††

Afilliations

*Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Hull, UK. **University of Huddersfield. †UK Harrogate and District Hospital, Harrogate, UK. ††Consultant Dermatologist and Honorary Clinical Reader, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, UK

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We recently reported on the dermatological diagnostic ability of primary healthcare professionals. This study was conducted remotely at a secure website containing 10 dermatological vignettes. In an attempt to gather user feedback on the site, participants were asked to complete an evaluation form after completion of each vignette.

OBJECTIVES

The aim of the present study was to explore the feedback provided by participants involved in the study.

METHODS

Data gathered from the evaluation form for each vignette was downloaded as an ms Excel® file and imported into SPSS (version 19) for subsequent descriptive analysis.

RESULTS

Sixty participants (20 each of GPs, nurses and community pharmacists) completed all 10 vignettes. More than half of GPs had seen each of the conditions in practice whereas the figure for nurses and pharmacists was more variable. For virtually all skin conditions, over 50% of all participants felt that the digital image used was a good representation of the problem. Using a 5 point scale (1 = not useful and 5 = very useful) a median value of 4 (all vignettes) was obtained for the usefulness of the background material as an aid to the diagnosis. Over 90 per cent of participants agreed with the diagnosis and management of all cases. Positive feedback on the vignettes was received by several participants.

CONCLUSION

The vignettes were well received by participants and there was general agreement with the clinical interpretation of the skin conditions. The site has some potential for use as an educational tool for health professionals.

Members Only

To view the full version of this paper you need to purchase a single download pdf.

If you have been granted access to paid content on Selfcare, please login

MENU